Dermatologist Recommended Anti-Aging Ingredients for Sensitive Skin

Summary:

Having sensitive skin does not mean you can’t use anti-aging ingredients that are effective at visibly reducing signs of aging like wrinkles and fine lines. If you have sensitive skin, you should look for formulas that are allergy-tested and tested on sensitive skin. Dermatologists recommend starting by using the product 1-2 times a week and gradually increase usage until your skin has built up a tolerance. Before applying the product to your face and neck, it also important to test the product yourself on your inner forearm to see if a reaction occurs. While there are countless ingredients available for treating various signs of aging, here are three skincare ingredients that dermatologists often recommend for sensitive skin to help reduce visible signs of aging:

THREE SKINCARE INGREDIENTS TO KNOW

Hyaluronic Acid.

A commonly used skincare ingredient, Hyaluronic acid, is a humectant naturally found in the skin. This skincare ingredient can hold up to 1000x its weight in water, which is important considering as we age our skin loses the ability to hold onto water and stay moisturized—causing visible loss of plumpness and suppleness in our skin’s appearance1. Hyaluronic acid is a skincare ingredient that can be used on all types of skin (oily, combination, and dry), including sensitive skin. It is also an ingredient that is used readily with other ingredients like Retinol and Vitamin C2. Formulas with Hyaluronic acid can help visually plump and hydrate the skin, helping to improve the appearance of lines, wrinkles, loss of plumpness, and dehydrated skin3.

Vitamin C.

Another commonly used skincare ingredient, Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid), is an antioxidant found naturally in our skin. Keep in mind when using Vitamin C in your skincare routine that it is an ingredient which readily reacts to air and light; overtime, the color and consistency of the product might change although it typically remains effective. Topical skincare products can supplement cutaneous Vitamin C and help skin look healthier overtime. As an ingredient, Vitamin C helps provide antioxidant protection against free-radical damage, which is caused by environmental stressors such as UV exposure or pollution. Keep in mind when using Vitamin C in your skincare routine that it is an ingredient that readily reacts to air and light; overtime, the color and consistency of the product might change although it typically remains effective. Ultimately, formulas with Vitamin C help visibly improve signs of aging, such as fine lines, dullness, and uneven skin tone6.

Retinol.

Retinol is a Vitamin A derivative and one of the most researched and recommended skincare ingredients. Two of its many benefits include helping to stimulate the shedding of dead skin cells while also targeting dark spots7. This skincare ingredient is known to aggravate skin, so we always suggest to start slow with any retinol product, using it 1-2 times week at first to see how it reacts on your skin. Then, once tolerance is built, one can begin using the ingredient on a more regular basis. Formulas with retinol can help to visibly target wrinkles, pore appearance, and skin texture and tone9.

Using Formulas with Skincare Ingredients Together in a Skin Care Routine.

Overall, these are only a few of the many skincare ingredients that can help mitigate the visual signs of aging—note that it is often better to use fewer ingredients when first starting out with an anti-aging routine given that at combinations of ingredients may affect the skin unpredictably. Click HERE to read more anti-aging skincare tips to incorporate into your daily routine.

Reference
  1. The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, March 2014, pages 27-29.
  2. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, December 2018, pages 1,682-1,695.
  3. Dermato-endocrinology, 2012 4(3), 253–258.
  4. Clinical Cosmetic Investigative Dermatology, 2013; 6: pages 221-232.
  5. Clinical Cosmetic Investigative Dermatology, 2013; 6: pages 221-232.
  6. Nutrients Journal, 2017, 9(8), Page 866.
  7. Indian Dermatology Online Journal, April-June 2013, pages 143-146.
  8. Indian Dermatology Online Journal, April-June 2013, pages 143-146.
  9. Clinical interventions in aging, 2016, 1(4), Pages 327–348.

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